Omeleto

To Live and Dine In L.A. ft. David Hasselhoff

By Sebastian Stenhoj | Comedy
Troubled locals and German tourists come together for a star-studded dining experience they won't soon forget.

One evening in Los Angeles, a group of disgruntled German tourists land in a Chinese restaurant, sharing the room with a series of locals dealing with their own personal problems.

But then none other than actor David Hasselhoff himself enters the restaurant, causing a minor stir, especially among the Germans. The icon, aware of the effect he’s having, swoops into the fray, solving their issues and revealing himself as a man of many talents — and as heroic as the famous characters he’s played.

The comic short — directed by Sebastian Stenhoj and written by Harry Chaskin — possesses a sly, offbeat wit that derives most of its humor from upending expectation and exploring the collision of sensibilities within a fascinatingly hermetic world.

The film’s style is reminiscent of early Jim Jarmusch, not just with its luminous black-and-white cinematography but with its focus on how eccentric personalities co-exist within a self-contained milieu. And also like Jarmusch, the storytelling and style explore the condition of foreignness and being a “stranger in a strange land” with intelligence and humor.

This particular “strange land,” though, is celebrity culture in Los Angeles. In a world saturated with pop culture — and where many people feel intense emotional attachment to worlds, figures and stories that seem more vivid than reality — our cultural imagination can make existing in everyday life seem odd, strange, flat or simply just boring.

But in Hollywood, famous actors, musicians and others pop up in places both heightened and banal, mixing the quotidian with the imaginative and creating a unique tension that’s productively explored in this short. The subtle, smart writing plays with this central dilemma of today’s star system, in which audiences both revel in and are disappointed by the idea that stars are “just like us.”

The joke, of course, is that the Hoff more than lives up to his heroic reputation, saving the proverbial day for most of these bickering, bedeviled characters. Hasselhoff plays himself with subtlety, charm and a disarming self-awareness that’s great fun to watch. He just wants to pick up his takeout in peace, but seeing the buzz his presence creates, he deals with each set of character with verve — and reveals himself to be both more multi-dimensional than anticipated — and just as amazing as Knight Rider.

“To Live and Dine In L.A.” is a self-assured comic gem that’s smart and impeccably calibrated to highlight its biggest asset, thanks to sharp writing and supremely stylish visuals. Beyond Hasselhoff himself, what’s most surprising about the story is how uncynical and even deeply human it is. It is easy to drift through the world, sealed off in our own bubble and unaware of the other small worlds in our vicinity — but it takes a hero like David Hasselhoff to look up from our self-absorption and make us aware of strange charm and wonder around us.





You Might Also Like:

Hold On

By Charlotte Scott-Wilson | Drama
A young cellist develops stage fright after one of her cello strings comes lose during an important performance.

Don’t Be a Hero ft. Missi Pyle

By Pete Lee | Drama
A middle-aged woman battles her loneliness and boredom by robbing banks in the guise of a cowboy on her lunch break.

Our Kind of Love

By Elham Ehsas and Azeem Bhati | Romance
An Afghan village girl goes on her first date in London.

Edmund the Magnificent ft. Ian McKellen, David Bradley

By Ben Ockrent | Comedy
A once-legendary farmer takes a chance and invest his life savings in a thoroughbred piglet.

Reception

By Joe Gillette | Romance
Two strangers, trying to avoid the crowd at a wedding reception, end up making an unexpected connection.

Exit Strategy

By Travis Bible | Sci-Fi
Two brothers caught in a time loop must traverse a series of maze-like events in order to prevent a catastrophic fire from occurring.

Garfield

By Georgi Bank-Davies | Romance
A young woman wakes up in a strange place, with a strange guy. Then, she start to piece together how she got there.

Partners

By Joey Ally | Romance
A couple's love life begins to slump, forcing them to reconsider the relationship and confront how intertwined they've become.

Small Arms ft. Tyler Young

By Arman Cole | Drama
A bullied college student seeks out shooting lessons with an ex-militia member to prove his manhood.

Spoetnik

By Noel Loozen | Comedy
A young man finds himself in between a food-truck and a brothel. Then, he meets his dream girl.

Long Branch

By Dane Clark and Linsey Stewart | Romance
A heartbroken woman finds a one-night stand. But the guy lives two hours away... via public transit.

Ten Thousand Days

By Michael Duignan | Comedy
A man is convinced he'll die on his 10,000th day. But when he meets a girl at his cousin's funeral, things don't go to plan.

Pawns

By Tyrees A. Lamptey | Drama
A WW1 soldier is trapped in a trench with the enemy... and it restores their faith in humanity.

Pitter Patter Goes My Heart ft. Vicky Krieps

By Christoph Rainer | Romance
A hopeless romantic takes desperate measures to win her former lover back. But he already has a new girl at his side.

Grape Soda

By Justin Robinson | Drama
A marriage, broken by death, is kept alive by the memories held through grape soda.


Your favorite short films you haven't seen yet.

Inspiring and insightful. Entertaining and enlightening. That's what you can expect here: no fluff. Just a steady stream of the best films delivered to your inbox.