Omeleto

F is for Friendship by Shaya Mulcahy

A young woman decides to air out some dirty laundry and brave the scrutiny of a catty dinner party to win back her name.

Struggling writer Emily decides to air out some dirty laundry and clear her name at a dinner party, clashing with a friend who’s more of a “frenemy” and shifting her identity in the process.

Writer and director Shaya Mulcahy’s sharp, witty short comedy is a self-contained world of its own, taking place mostly over the course of one very contentious dinner party. The drama is excellently paced, keeping viewers drawn in with juicy tension and conflict.

The cinematography and editing is loose and fun, evoking a creative, shambolic existence that feels constantly improvised and revised — and very true to the world of a creative young adult trying to find her place in the world while others around her seem to fall into success with ease. Perfectly calibrated performances bring a smart, sophisticated script to life, illuminating a complicated portrait of female friendship and competition.

In her quest to clear her name, Emily experiences a shift in self-perception, moving from a place of self-loathing to one of self-acceptance. Fans of female-focused sharp-edged urban fare — think “Girls,” for example — will find the deep interest in one woman’s quest to speak her truth deeply fascinating.

In an age where “empowerment” has become a marketing term, “F is for Friendship” is a true lesson in what it means to claim your power, take responsibility for your life — and create authenticity in the process.





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